Trestle table made from reclaimed white oak with iron accents.
Top view show the wonderful wood color. This is natural and not stained.
12 foot reclaimed red oak dining room table.
Stretcher on a trestle table with forge welded straps.
Original old pegs re-used on the table.
Smaller trestle table with nice iron accents.
Ash trestle table with Antique Woodworks mantel in background.
The ash was recovered from storm damaged trees on the customers property.
Reclaimed wood trestle table with stretcher inspired by a wagon’s buck board bench.
Close-up: A modern take on the bulbous style of the late 1500s.
A modern take on the bulbous style of the late 1500s.
Close-up: Massive, heavy, original hand hewn timbers make this table a stunning centerpiece.
Massive, heavy, original hand hewn timbers make this table a stunning centerpiece.
40×78 farm table with hand hewn timbers from an old 1800s vintage granary. Hand Hewn top with lots of character as well.
A beautiful live edge adorns this table top.
Original mortise holes still in the hand hewn timbers. Sapwood accents
Heavy reclaimed wood top original cut from log cabin timbers.
Heavy white oak table made from reclaimed floor joists.
A hand hammered iron accent on the end, reminiscent of old industrial warehouse supports.
A nearly 3×10 stretcher connects the legs together.
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As with nearly all of our farm tables, we specialize in using the very best reclaimed wood. More often than not, we use reclaimed white oak because of the great color variations. White oak starts out as a wheatish-tan and develops deep coffee browns as it is exposed to ammonia in the environment. It develops a far more interesting patina than any other reclaimed wood. But you’ll also see that we use others such red elm, red oak, pine, ash, and black walnut.

This table design, with two legs and a horizontal stretcher between them, is usually referred to as a trestle table. The basic design dates back to the Middle Ages and was refined in the 16th century. We are very fond of this style for two primary reasons: clean seating anywhere around the table as well as long-term stability and strength. When built well, a trestle table can be pushed and tossed around with virtually no movement — even without the top attached. Conversely, with legged tables, there is an incredible amount of leveraged stress where the leg is attached to the apron and table top. That’s where the H-Stretcher design in Farm Tables is a great idea. Tables naturally get dragged and pushed throughout their lifetime. With a legged table, this eventually weakens the joints. With a trestle table design, those stresses are just not there.