Reclaimed Ash with a modern CNC cut base. The finish is meant to give that natural look but still function as a solid top coat.
This conference room table was one that I’d been wanting to do for years. It is all hand-hammered iron with rivets in a bridge-like style.
Black walnut slab table top. Legs modeled after an old machine style bench, and now crafted by a blacksmith.
Reclaimed white oak tabletop on a old industrial machine base. It accented with great white oak stretcher with lots of character.
Communal bar-height table. Reclaimed white oak tabletop on a old industrial machine base. It accented with great white oak stretcher with lots of character.
A flat-iron table made with streaked white oak rather than cherry.
Close-up: A flat-iron table made with streaked white oak rather than cherry.
The wood comes from floor joists from a plant owned by Thomas Edison. They build phonograph cabinets in this New London, Wisconsin facility.
Most of the building had hemlock floor joists. However, this one little section had a mix of cherry and poplar — the primary and secondary woods in furniture building.
One can only imagine that they ran out of wood, or grabbed the wrong pile… but cherry floor joists they were.
This industrial base was acquired in an action from a gentleman whose father once worked on airplanes with Charles Lindbergh and Howard Hughes. The top is a strong patina White Oak. It was actually darkened by using ammonia.
Another great industrial machine base. This base was from a Nash Spindle Sander dating back to 1904. The customer kept the additional mechanical parts so the machine could be put back together.
This industrial table shows a great use of old screw jacks. We used wood blocks to acheive the required 42in bar height.
The iron has been sandblasted, treated with tannic acid (a very, very mild acid — much like gun bluing), and then coated with satin poly spray.
The top is rustic tongue and groove douglas fir from a barn floor. Lots of character. Made for a conference room in Chicago, Illinois.
A conference room table built upon an old industrial machine base. The mechanics still move up and down on this old table.
As a play off of the elements in the previous table, this table sports a trapozoidal base and a neat wood-iron-wood sandwiched stretcher.
The iron has been sandblasted, treated with tannic acid (a very, very mild acid — much like gun bluing), and then coated with satin poly spray.

These industrial machine base tables have such a great “cool” factor. I had dreamed of designing tables from old industrial parts over 25 years ago. It was pretty amazing to see our first piece come together.

Just like in our wood tops, we seek out a style for our iron that is natural, warm, and authentic. For iron table bases, we usually need to sand blast the piece to get it cleaned up. However, we then use our special finish to give the metal a nice original feel. When well finished, the old iron has a nice range of hues from blue-gray to nearly black – but never even-toned, modern powder coated or spray painted color.

While I honestly would prefer to see these old machines preserved, I have seen all too many old machines getting scrapped and shipped off to China to be melted down. So, the next best thing to preservation is to convert these great old American machine bases into great modern tables.

In addition to original old machines, there are a several pieces here that are “ industrial inspired. ” These are all hand worked by blacksmiths. They are not simply cast reproductions of and old base. There is a lot of handwork and craft in each one of these.